Start a new search to find trip ideas
 

Planning a trip? Consider this idea from a fellow Boomerater

"How Vietnamese artists keep the traditional village alive "

lanhnguyen
Submitted by: lanhnguyen Length of trip: Less than a week
Trip taken: January 2008 No. of people on trip: 1 person

Locations visited:

Far East and Asia: Vietnam

Trip Features:

lanhnguyen took this trip with her Immediate family and also recommends this trip for those traveling with their:
> Guy Friends
> Extended, large family
> Significant other/Spouse
> Group of friends

The cost category of this trip was:

TRIP DESCRIPTION

Canh Hoach village hasn’t always been synonymous with birdcages. At one time the tiny hamlet, just an hour's drive from Hanoi, was devoted to heavy industry. While the signpost still features the old name, Vac, which literally means to carry heavy objects', the villages have turned to lighter, not to mention more picturesque, work.

Villages dedicated to particular handicrafts are common in Vietnam. At least 50 specialized villages surround Hanoi. They produce such diverse wares as rice paper, ceramics, snake wine, furniture, noodles, and silk. Some villages have manufactories; others have responded to more recent market demands. Sadly, many of the old handicraft skills are dying out as more and younger people leave to study and work in the city.

Nguyen Van Ti introducer’s birdcage making to Canh Hoach. He taught his son, Nguyen Van Nghi (1917-a995) who in turn taught several of the village finest craftspeople. Nghi's wife, Ngoi, and their son, Su, continue to make delicate birdcages, complete with bau ruou intricately carved wood and bone lings. Elaborate custom hangers. Elaborate, custom ordered cages can fetch up to VND2m.

Despite their many years of experience, Ngoi and her son can earn only VND15, 000-20,000 per day from their craft. This is too little to support the whole family and like many birdcage makers in Canh Hoach, they continue to rely on rice farming for their main income. One exception is the Bui family, who make cages even during the rice harvests in May and September. They hire laborers to harvest their five acres of paddy.

Old faiths, new jobs

In the centre of Canh Hoach stands a spectacular Catholic cathedral. Both Buddhist and Christian families live here and traditionally different work. In the past, the Buddhist families made gio tra, bamboo baskets used to insulate tea pots, The Catholics, meanwhile, made paper for fans and firecrackers.

The Bui family is Christian. When firecrackers were outlawed in 1993, they lost their main source of livelihood. Quy approached the Buddhist salary to learn their craft."I have affair for it," he says. "I learned in a third the amount of time it takes many people."When Quy had mastered the necessary skills he taught his wife, Thu, and her 16-year old brother.

Today, the three of them each earn around VND15, 000 per day. They concentrate on high-end, custom -ordered cages, which take two people two full days' work to complete and fetch around VND100,000. The average cage in the street costs only a tenth that and can be made by one person in half a day. "It is better than working in the hot sun in the fields," says Thu. "This way, I can spend more time in the house with my children."

Some of the skills needed to make gio tra, the bamboo tea baskets, have been carried over for the production of birdcages. To make the cages' bases, which are round, very fresh bamboo is pushed through a ban nan, a device used to bend the stalks. When the stalks are the right shape they are wired together, then dipped in boiling water to prevent them from splitting. The bamboo is then left to soak for a month. Later, a hand held drill, or khoan run, is used to punch holes into the base. Bamboo strips, which have been threaded through an instrument that shaves off bumps, become the cage's bars. Finally, the cage is embellished with carving.

Hang Da market in Hanoi hosts a lively bird market. As you peer at the brightly colored birds, spare a thought for the birdcage makers. In the future their skills will certainly grows what the signpost on the road to Canh Hoach will say in the future.

This article written by Lanh Nguyen from Vietnam Heritage Travel

For original article, please visit:

http://vacationstovietnam.com/lastest-travel-news/how-vietnamese-artists-keep-the-traditional-village-alive.html

http://vietnampackagetour.com

http://vietnamhoneymoontours.com

http://travelagencyinvietnam.com


Was this information helpful? Yes No

0 out of 0 people found this information helpful

Write a Comment about this trip idea

Did this trip idea inspire you? Do you have additional insights to offer other Boomeraters?

Please take a moment to share your thoughts in a sentence or two.

Only registered Boomeraters can comment on a trip. Log in to your account or Sign up now (it's free)

Other trip ideas

Other trip ideas you might enjoy:

  • "Sweet lullabies"

    Locations: Far East and Asia: Vietnam

    lanhnguyen
    Submitted by: lanhnguyen

    Most Vietnamese children are familiar with lullabies. Whether sung by our mothers, grandmothers or older sisters sweet, gentle lullabies are of our cultural memory. Among Vietnam’s ethnic groups, the Kinh majority has the moat lullabies. In northern, central and southern Vietnam there are at least ...

    Trip Features: Culture: Museums, Music, History

  • "Top 5 Musical shows in Vietnam"

    Locations: Far East and Asia: Vietnam

    lanhnguyen
    Submitted by: lanhnguyen

    Nha Nhac On November 7, 2003, UNESCO bestowed world heritage status on 28 relics of nations as masterpieces of oral and intangible heritage of humanity. Among the 11 masterpieces of Asia, nha nhac (royal music) represents the first intangible legacy of Vietnam to have been put on this list. The UNESC...

    Trip Features: Culture: Ethnic/Religious, Cityscapes, Music, History

  • "Brau ethnic group"

    Locations:

    lanhnguyen
    Submitted by: lanhnguyen

    Lables: Brau ethnic group, Ethnic Groups, Mon-Khmer Group Other names: Brao. Population: 231 people, (1999 census). Language: Brau language belongs to the Mon-Khmer language group (of the Aus- troasiatic language family). History: The first Brau came to Vietnam about a century ago. They live mainly i...

    Trip Features: Culture: Ethnic/Religious

Start a new search to find trip ideas.

SUBMIT A TRIP YOU'VE TAKEN

Go and Tell!

Have you traveled somewhere or planned a great trip you think other Boomers would enjoy?

Tell us about the best parts of your trip, your favorite restaurants and hotels and any other info that will help fellow Boomeraters get going.

Only registered Boomeraters can submit a trip. Log in to your account or Sign up now (it's free)

Submit your trip

Recent travel questions

"Furnished suites Toronto suggestions? "
If you're looking for furnished suites Toronto location, see The Rosemont Residences. They offer 1-2...
poetmars777
1 replies
"Transport to Johor Bahru from Singapore"
If you're traveling to Singapore, you should definitely cross the border to Malaysia as well, partic...
poetmars777
0 replies
"What should I bring on a school trip to Universal Studios?"
Hi! I am going to a school trip overnight this week on friday, I can't wait to go! I wonder and w...
connor_
0 replies
"What should I bring on a school trip to Universal Studios?"
Hi! I am going to a school trip overnight next week, I can't wait to go! I wonder and wanted to k...
connor_
0 replies


See other Travel questions

Go and Tell!

Have you traveled somewhere or planned a great trip you think other Boomers would enjoy?

Tell us about the best parts of your trip, your favorite restaurants and hotels and any other info that will help fellow Boomeraters get going.

Submit your trip